Posts Tagged ‘JTAG Testing’

Posted on March 1, 2020 in flynn systems, JTAG

When large numbers of outputs switch simultaneously, they can cause intermittency with your test due the ground bounce effect. JTAG Test with onTAP lets you control this problem by giving you control over how many outputs switch during a single test scan, as shown below:   Understanding ground bounce In manufacturing test environments, it’s not […]

Posted on November 1, 2019 in Boundary Scan, JTAG, JTAG Boundary Scan

That’s an easy one. With onTAP’s TAP CONNECT JTAG Controller, you can run an unlimited number of chains simultaneously. Each TAP CONNECT JTAG Controller has two channels which provides the opportunity to run two chains at once. Furthermore, additional chains are handled with ease by additional Controllers. In fact, there are no restrictions on the […]

Chip manufacturers are now producing multichip modules (MCMs) that may include two or more arrays of devices within a single package. These modules can be tested using JTAG test pattern generation of the devices while on a PCB. To incorporate JTAG testing of MCMs there are several things that are needed: a netlist of the […]

Posted on April 15, 2015 in onTAP JTAG Blog

In our last discussion, we talked about DFT, which plays a significant role in reducing costs in prototyping. There are a wide variety of reasons that prototyping is a significant expense in the development and production processes. A large part of the cost is the increasing complexity of designs, inclusion of more processors and FPGA’s, greatly reduced board real estate, and diminishing test access. With the cost of FPGA’s and processors rising as they too become more powerful, getting small batches of devices is expensive. If one of those devices is fried during prototype testing, the cost to prototype a new design escalates rapidly, especially if the cause of the failure isn’t quickly determined.

Posted on April 8, 2015 in onTAP JTAG Blog

Design for Testability, often referred to as DFT, is a critical part of developing a new board. Here’s a link to a terrific class lecture from University of Maryland if you’re interested in seeing a well represented academic presentation of such an important topic.